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Microsoft confirms daily online requirement, limited used games

microsoft-xbox-one

Microsoft has released the official details about the Xbox One’s online connectivity and used games policy.  While it won’t need a constant internet connection, the Xbox One requires users log in once every 24 hours on their main console and once every hour on other consoles.  Xbox One games can be traded in to “participating retailers.” Up to ten people can use your game library from any Xbox One, and you can give your Xbox One games away to someone else, but you are required to have been friends on Xbox One for 30 days, and you can only give a game away once.

Microsoft had very hazy policies on these two topics, until now, and I couldn’t be more disappointed.  It seems people care more about their used games than anything else, because that seemed to be the issue on various message boards as opposed to literal DRM.  What no one seems to realize is that PC games don’t have a used option, and it works just fine.  If anything, PC gaming is better off because, without used games, developers can afford to have huge sales on their games because they are making a profit.  When someone buys a used game at GameStop, the developers see none of that money.  I was hoping the Xbox One would embrace digital distribution in exchange for used games, and possibly opt for a system similar to Steam.  Instead, used games still exist with new, strange restrictions.

Meanwhile, the online policy remains the same, connect online once a day, or we take your games.  Or once an hour if you are not on your main console.  This is DRM, plain and simple.  And it should never be tolerated, especially when it is coming from the console itself.  This is a ridiculous requirement, and the fact that it went through unscathed while used games were shoehorned into the system is insanity.  At this point, none of the next-generation consoles have managed to catch my interest.  Rather, I feel more isolated as a gamer than ever before.  Of course, E3 is right around the corner, but even if Microsoft pulled out all the stops, I can’t see myself opting into such a system.

 

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